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New It pains me to follow Trumps advise to his Base . . .
. . but I did it anyway. I want out and got my booster shot. Of course, Trumps Base won't. They have actually booed him on this issue.

One thing I've found is that Rite Aid's appointment scheduling software qualifies for an award - an award for outstandingly bad Web development. It's even worse that Walgreen's, which lost my appointment last year. The only one that actually works well is CVS's.

So this year I had to stand in line as a "walk-in" despite emails confirming my appointment.
New It's too bad that the scheduling did not work right for you.
I used CVS for the first two Moderna shots and Walgreens for the booster. The scheduling systems was OK, but it still took time to wait at the drug store because there were too many folks in line for the shots.

The other problem was that the drug stores were not the local ones, a couple miles away, but ones about 15 miles away.
Alex

"There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."

-- Isaac Asimov
New I'm in the sticks.
It took two weeks to get a third booster. This should not be an issue. You just have to allocate the time.
New CVS has the physical process dialed in, too
Portable office trailer out in the parking lot, tiny one, fits in one parking space. Three spaces next to that roped off with cones and yellow tape and signs saying "COVID shots only".

Scheduled for a 15-minute slot. Drive up and they call to confirm you're who they're expecting. Someone comes out, I roll down my window, we both stay masked, as she shows me how to swab and I pull it from the vial. She goes back inside (it's cold out) while I swab for 15 seconds each side. Comes back out and I stick the swab back in the vial.

Total time there, <5 minutes. Total personal contact, about 30 seconds, through a car window, while we're both masked. By the time I got home I had already gotten the email with the results.

As for the sites, the thing CVS has right is that you can identify whether they have any openings first, then start filling in your info. The other sites all make you walk through 3-4 pages of data entry first, only to tell you at the end that they don't have any open appointments.
--

Drew
New Well, my wife and my shots at CVS were inside the drug store.
We checked in with someone at the store entrance and given an ID card and then distance spread standing waited in line for the shot. After the shot we sat in a chair for 10-15 minutes to make sure we did not have a quick reaction to the shot.
Alex

"There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."

-- Isaac Asimov
New I like winndixie
call the pharmacy and ask when the slack times are. walk in less than 15 minute wait
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of the experts" – Richard Feynman
New This was one thing the State did right up here
They set up their own sites. The nearest one to us was in a abandoned JC Penney. (15 miles but then we're 10 miles away from anything anyway ;-) Plenty of space for boots and fainting area. The appointment website was a snap. CVS, OTOH, was a complete disaster. You had to pick a slot first, then fill in endless screens of personal and insurance info. By the end, the slot was no longer available. Start over. And no, it did not remember any of the previously entered data. (But I guess improvements have been made?)

By the time the boosters came around, the site had moved to a smaller spot and was operated by walk-in as well as by appointment. I walked in and got the shot within 15'.
New I was rather annoyed at having to wait in line when I arrived ~3 minutes before my appointment...
Grumbled to myself about "Dammit, I got an appontment for a booster shot, not for waiting in line!" for the 10-15 minutes it took to be let in the front door and then after a couple additional minutes of queuing indoors be sent to a booth with a nurse. After the nurse had scanned my ID card's barcode she asked, "Shall I cancel this appointment you have in February, then?", and I was rather confused... Had someone else already booked me in, before I did the day before? (I was thinking, maybe the THL or some such had pre-booked people belonging to "enhanced risk groups", i.e. me for being diabetic.) Or had I somehow managed to inadvertently book two appointments? (Should that even be possible; what kind of crappy Web UI allows allows that?)

When she showed me that appointment booking that the scanning of my ID had put on her screen, the horrible truth dawned on me: I didn't have an appointment that day at all! What I had thought was a booking for the next day was actually for, I think it was the tenth, of February. It was the only booking I had, and for the exact time of day I had. I must simply not have noticed that the first time slots the Web UI offered were not for the following day (IIRC I made the booking late in the evening), but the first available at the rough time of day ("Early afternoon", IIRC) I had selected in the previous step -- and those were six weeks out at the time.

Very pragmatically, though, the nurse just cancelled my upcoming appointment, told me to roll up my sleeve, and gave me the shot anyway. She had an air about her as though mine wasn't the first case of patient screw-up, or perhaps patient line-jumping. A net time saving for all concerned, I suppose -- saved me the future trip and queueing, and some other nurse another whole hello-sit-down-scan-the-ID-roll-up-your-sleeve-swab-jab transaction, which she had already pretty much completed -- so smart that way, but damn embarrassing to have jumped the line like that. During the obligatory fifteen-minute sit-down in another big hall, I checked the confirmation SMS I had received, and yes, of course it said February. I just hadn't even noticed the actual date there either, blithely assuming it was for the next day. Assumption is the mother of (almost) all fuck-ups.

That'll teach me to grumble about waiting in line... No wonder the process gets a bit clogged, when fuckwits like me arrive at time slots they haven't booked.
--

   Christian R. Conrad
The Man Who Apparently Still Knows Fucking Everything


Mail: Same username as at the top left of this post, at iki.fi
New "... except how to read a calendar."
;-)

Blame COVID-19 - it has warped spacetime. Teleworking about half the time since March 2020 has thrown my sense of time all out of whack, also too.

Glad you are boosterized!

Cheers,
Scott.
New Been in the office 4 times since March 2019
We're back to 1 day a week on site but that has been cancelled since the last week of December. Officially so we could enjoy the holidays but it was just extended. Don't mention the COVID numbers ;-)
New It's strange.
Things are so different from the Before Times...

Unfortunately, the SCOTUS seems to be wanting to throw gravel in the gears of sensible mandates. And while Omicron appears less severe on an individual basis, it's still gravely serious in aggregate.

NYMag:

[...]

But while this is all encouraging, it is not clear that those same patterns observed abroad will hold here in the U.S. In fact, there are already early signs in hospitalization and ICU data that the experience of Omicron in America may be harsher than has been observed so far in Europe. This should perhaps not come as a surprise, given that Delta was much more lethal in the U.S. than in Europe — and the current data may still reflect some lingering cases of that variant. And it does not mean a tsunami of deaths is right around the corner or that this new variant will mean for the U.S. what Delta meant for India. (To begin with, the U.S. is, by global standards, very well vaccinated.) But the higher rate of severity observed so far is a reminder that the shape of a pandemic is not simply a matter of the biological properties of the virus; it is also determined by the social and immunological context in which that virus spreads. And it appears that, with Omicron as with Delta, the American context may be different enough to make a real difference, delivering perhaps considerably more severe illness and death than we’ve seen on the other side of the Atlantic.

With Delta, many Americans observed a miraculously light British wave and effectively ignored the real carnage that followed here — 100,000 Americans dead, and September and October was the deadliest two-month phase of the pandemic outside of last winter’s horrific surge. With Omicron, the same pattern — optimism from Europe followed by overlooked suffering here — seems troublingly possible again. And if you’re hoping for an outcome resembling South Africa’s, where COVID deaths during the Omicron wave didn’t reach even 10 percent of the previous peak, keep in mind that the U.S. began this wave on a Delta plateau 50 percent as high as our previous peak of daily deaths.

To this point in the Omicron surge, at least, American fatalities have not grown dramatically from that plateau, and the small rise we have observed is as likely to be the result of ongoing Delta cases as Omicron infections (that is how fast this surge has come upon us — our data are still telling a story about the last one). Anecdotal reporting from around the country suggests that while new patients are crowding hospitals and emergency rooms, to the doctors working in those hospitals the Omicron cases appear, on the whole, less serious. But while the New York Times reported this week this wave is putting less pressure on ICUs than previous ones, state data tell a different story: A comparable proportion of hospitalized cases are already now in the ICU as was the case in New York during the winter surge of early 2021. Then, hospital admissions reached 9,000; now, we’re already past 10,000. ICU admissions got to 1,600; now, we’re at 1,404.

[...]


Being able to be away from the office has made it easier to stay safe, but it's weird.

Stay safe, everyone.

Cheers,
Scott.
New Yeah I'm at the airport
M has to do some traveling. This is weird.
New About twice as many for me.
New And how much did it help?
Idunno, maybe some: Perhaps that's why this Covid-19 infection I have ongoing is as mild as it is, perhaps it would have been much worse without that third vax.

But it sure didn't stop it from happening altogether.
--

   Christian R. Conrad
The Man Who Apparently Still Knows Fucking Everything


Mail: Same username as at the top left of this post, at iki.fi
New It if keeps you out of the hospital, it helps a lot and is doing its job.
Boss and SIL have gotten it, and have had mild cases.

Get better.

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
New Get well soon!
Alex

"There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."

-- Isaac Asimov
     It pains me to follow Trumps advise to his Base . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (15)
         It's too bad that the scheduling did not work right for you. - (a6l6e6x) - (1)
             I'm in the sticks. - (crazy)
         CVS has the physical process dialed in, too - (drook) - (1)
             Well, my wife and my shots at CVS were inside the drug store. - (a6l6e6x)
         I like winndixie - (boxley)
         This was one thing the State did right up here - (scoenye)
         I was rather annoyed at having to wait in line when I arrived ~3 minutes before my appointment... - (CRConrad) - (8)
             "... except how to read a calendar." - (Another Scott) - (4)
                 Been in the office 4 times since March 2019 - (scoenye) - (3)
                     It's strange. - (Another Scott) - (1)
                         Yeah I'm at the airport - (crazy)
                     About twice as many for me. -NT - (CRConrad)
             And how much did it help? - (CRConrad) - (2)
                 It if keeps you out of the hospital, it helps a lot and is doing its job. - (Another Scott)
                 Get well soon! -NT - (a6l6e6x)

Poke yourself in the eye.
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