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New Kraut Night.
This year my Musica Donavania events have been a little different. "Frog Night" featured all French music, as usual, but the cuisine was all from France's nearly forgotten West African Empire. The next was "Brit Night", which featured all English music, but the cuisine was all from England's nearly forgotten West African Empire.

The October event, was "Kraut Night", with all German music, and the cuisine was all from German East Africa, now known as Tanzania. The food got rave reviews as usual.

Kraut Night Menu

My next will be a Russian Winter event in December. We don't have Winter here, so we have to celebrate the season vicariously, and there's nowhere more "wintery" than Russia. In keeping with the previous events, the "Rusky" event will feature cuisine from Russia's former Central Asian Empire, "The Stans" (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan).

Interestingly, Uzbekistan includes significant Jewish and Korean influences. How the Jews got there is not clear, but Stalin exiled a half million Koreans to the region. Upon the fall of the Soviet Union, nearly all the Jews left for Israel and the U.S., but most of the Koreans are still there. Korean salads are popular and very much seen in the markets.

One problem for authenticity of my menu is that I won't be able to get horse meat, much used in the region, unless I smuggle it from Mexico. Even Congress realized the ban on horse meat was disastrous, but the do-gooders and the horsey set are still fighting to prevent it being available. Of course neither of those groups is at all interested in feeding many thousands of unwanted horses, so they get packed into 18 wheelers and sent to Mexico.
New Omigawd..
I though you might have expanded your recipes under 'German dishes' into naked cannibalism, perhaps including re the appurtenances: Kristallnacht Kraut glassware?

My bad :-/
New Well, I did . . .
. . wear my Luftwaffe Soldier** Officer's Jacket (tropical, Africa Corps).

And I did play a few minutes of the Host Wessel Song to mark the end of the Romantic era and dominance of Germany and Austria in music. It was an old rendition sung by genuine Nazis. This was followed by music of the post-war era (Carl Orff, Catulli Carmina).

Playlist

** Luftwaffe Soldier - The Luftwaffe owned all the FLAK guns, including the famous 88s (FLAK-18 / FLAK-36) so the guys manning those guys were separate from the Wehrmacht soldiers, even when using the FLAK-36 against tanks. In North Africa, where they were first used against tanks, one British captive complained to his capturing officer that it was "very unfair to use FLAK guns against tanks".
New An admirable selection, wish I could have flown in but the Lear-jet needs new tires.
Have you perhaps in your library?
Audio Rarities #2445, Hitler's Inferno? (on vinyl, natch.)
Subtitled Marching Songs of Nazi Germany

'Tis an assemblage including Ho(r)st Wessel's charming tune-screed as, Die Fahne Hoch aka Horst Wessel song. This along with 9 other tracks incl. Adolf Hitler speaks in Rome 1937, concluding with The defendents (Hess, Von Ribbentrop, etc. plead "Not Guilty" at Nuremberg.

Ad page torn from 'The Saturday Review of Books' is dated April 7, 1962. JFK had another 19 months to go.
Have 'we' another 19 months? before some of us are hors de combat, barricades-wise. (Keep that helmet! eh?)
;^>
New I served with a guy who did that
He was commanding an artillery battery in Iraq. They got out ahead of their armored support and Iraqi tanks started rushing them up a hill.

The 155mm Howitzer is calibrated for indirect fire. But when you're facing tanks and all you've got is small arms and Howitzers, you throw out the safety guidelines, jack up the trail legs, and shoot straight downhill.
--

Drew
New M109?
It does have a direct fire aiming plate. Things get interesting when you compare the ranges on that plate to the lethal perimeter of the HE shells...
New Might have been, but that's not what they did
They were emplaced and getting ready to support an offensive, but the Iraqis saw them before armored cav was ready. So instead of blocking the retreat, they ended up going on the offensive. They didn't have time to do anything but jack the legs up and eyeball it.

And speaking of lethal perimeter ... I went to cover a CAX as a combat correspondent and wanted to get some good artillery photos. I asked the CO how far to the side I needed to be if I wanted to be forward of the firing line. He told me to stay outside the aiming stakes and gave me some ear protection.

I set up with my knee against the stake, so I was between 30 & 45 degrees out of line and about 30 meters out. Every time they fired the camera body rang like a bell. And that wasn't even the explosive, just the propellant.
--

Drew
Expand Edited by drook Nov. 5, 2018, 07:40:16 PM EST
New Not quite on the Flak 88
Its anti-tank use was pioneered by the Condor Legion during the Spanish Civil War, and it was used in that role throughout the war. Rommel's use in Africa is most famous because due to the epic nature of that adventure. (Small isolated group lays waste to overwhelmingly stronger force until they run out parts, then on their retreat almost succeed in driving the US landing force back into the sea, etc...)
New Kraut night is kraut with Polish Kielbasa at my house.
Makes my mouth water thinking about it. :)
Alex

"There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."

-- Isaac Asimov
New Aye, indeed!
Being a child of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth, I'm very much attuned to Sauerkraut.

All the references say Sauerkraut was invented by the Chinese to keep workers alive while building the Great Wall. That is not so. What they had was Napa Cabbage (actually a turnip green) soaked in vinegar, not real Sauerkraut.

I suspect real, naturally fermented Sauerkraut was invented in Poland. The Poles had huge salt mines, so could afford to salt ferment vegetables. Salt was still very expensive in most of the world, including China. It didn't become inexpensive until vast salt pans were established on the coast of Portugal.

I well Remembered the Sauerkraut Soup my mother made (not nearly often enough - she was a very reluctant cook). During my vegetarian period, I set about making a vegetarian version. It was highly successful and still my favorite Sauerkraut Soup, but I have made many dishes with Sauerkraut and Sausages, with Pork, and everything else that works.

I used to use Meters Wisconsin Kraut, which was very good, but they stopped producing it. Now, however, the multi-ethnic markets I shop at have a half dozen excellent brands imported from Poland.
New Kim Chee has been around for a while as well
Not exclusively cabbage though
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of the experts" – Richard Feynman
New Re: Kim Chee has been around for a while as well
The date of origin of kimchee is unknown, but salt fermented vegetables were fairly commonplace by 500 CE, and the process well established. Korean radish was the most common vegetable used.

Chili peppers did not appear in kimchee until 1614 and their use was not widespread until the 19th century, when it was discovered that sufficient chili reduced the amount of expensive salt needed. There is no evidence Napa Cabbage (actually a turnip green) was brought to Korea before the late 19th century. Lists of kimchee ingredients are extant from much earlier time into the 19th century, but no form of cabbage (real cabbage or turnip greens) is mentioned.

I read an absurd Korean denial of all this claiming that cabbage kimchee with chilis was made "thousands of years ago", which is impossible, because all chilis originated in South and Central America, and were brought to East Asia by the Portuguese around 1600. Some researchers think birds may have carried one variety of chili to Africa before arrival of the Portuguese, but this is doubtful.

Certainly there were none in East Asia until the Portuguese brought them. One of the hottest species is called chinense, but that was a mistake by a botanist who saw so many in East Asia he thought they must have originated there. They came from Brazil.
New Neat! Thanks for the info
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of the experts" – Richard Feynman
New Aldi’s has one from Germany that pretty decent.
It comes in a jar and beats the plastic bagged ones that you find in the grocery stores.
Alex

"There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."

-- Isaac Asimov
New The all-time worst sauerkraut came in a plastic bag.
That was Trader Joe's, many, many years ago. I tried it and found it to be horrid. Then the LA Times test kitchen tried it, and declared it inedible.
New Jews in Uzbekistan.
There have long been odd little pockets of Jews all around that part of the world. Apparently, there are one or two stops on the Trans-Siberian Railway that are essentially Jewish towns.

It is known that a major centre of Jewish learning was in Persia for many hundreds if not thousands of years. They were descendants of those carted away from their homeland by the Babylonians. We know that a lot went back under the Persians, but the Bible neglects to mention that not all of them did. They may well have created pockets of Judaism north and east of there over the centuries.

Wade.
New Jewish Autonomous Oblast in Russia
In the Russian Far East, bordering China, this was a convenient repository for Jews. At its peak, there were nearly 50,000 Jews, but upon the fall of the Soviet Union most of them emigrated. In 2010 there were only 1,628 left (less than 1% of the population), and there are probably a lot fewer now.

There was a lot of adjustment in Central Asia and far flung parts of Russia at the fall of the Soviet Union. Tatars, Ukrainians, Volga Germans and other eths who had been exiled returned to their homelands. The Jews also left, primarily for Israel and the United States, but also to other countries. A lot of Koreans seem to be OK with Central Asia, though - probably heard it gets real cold in Korea. Korean soups and salads have become quite popular in Uzbekistan.
New If they were from what is now North Korea, they would almost certainly stay.
And not just because North Korea has brutal winters and not a lot of arable land.

Wade.
     Kraut Night. - (Andrew Grygus) - (17)
         Omigawd.. - (Ashton) - (6)
             Well, I did . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (5)
                 An admirable selection, wish I could have flown in but the Lear-jet needs new tires. - (Ashton)
                 I served with a guy who did that - (drook) - (2)
                     M109? - (scoenye) - (1)
                         Might have been, but that's not what they did - (drook)
                 Not quite on the Flak 88 - (scoenye)
         Kraut night is kraut with Polish Kielbasa at my house. - (a6l6e6x) - (6)
             Aye, indeed! - (Andrew Grygus) - (5)
                 Kim Chee has been around for a while as well - (boxley) - (2)
                     Re: Kim Chee has been around for a while as well - (Andrew Grygus) - (1)
                         Neat! Thanks for the info -NT - (boxley)
                 Aldi’s has one from Germany that pretty decent. - (a6l6e6x) - (1)
                     The all-time worst sauerkraut came in a plastic bag. - (Andrew Grygus)
         Jews in Uzbekistan. - (static) - (2)
             Jewish Autonomous Oblast in Russia - (Andrew Grygus) - (1)
                 If they were from what is now North Korea, they would almost certainly stay. - (static)

If there are really aliens, I would think that L. Ron Hubbard would have to be one of them.
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