IWETHEY v. 0.3.0 | TODO
1,095 registered users | 0 active users | 0 LpH | Statistics
Login | Create New User
IWETHEY Banner

Welcome to IWETHEY!

New You have a compost *pit* ... wow
===

Kip Hawley is still an idiot.

===

Purveyor of Doc Hope's [link|http://DocHope.com|fresh-baked dog biscuits and pet treats].
[link|http://DocHope.com|http://DocHope.com]
New Yes, I dig a new one when one fills up . . .
. . shoveling all the dirt over the old one. It's a mound for only a few weeks, gradually sagging back to level with the rest of the ground. A year later about all that can be found is a few crumbling bones.

I have a compost pile too, but that's just for stuff that's been fed through the tree eating machine - no kitchen waste in that one.
[link|http://www.aaxnet.com|AAx]
New What do you do with the compost?
I didnt know you gardened.
You arent supposed to compost animal parts,dontcha know. It makes foul compost and ATTRACTS ANIMALS!
New Well, knowing Andrew...
... it's probably an ingredient in some obscure Asian recipe.
Regards,

-scott anderson

"Welcome to Rivendell, Mr. Anderson..."
New I don't have to do anything with it.
It's just absorbed by the ground - never to be seen (or smelled) again. I'm presuming it adds nutrients to the ground but when I dig a new pit a year later there's nothing there but sand and a few disintegrating bones.

If I'm planting something I use stuff from the pile that's been through the chipper - no kitchen wastes in that pile.

Things planted or trnasplanted within the last year or so: kaffir lime tree, angelica, basil, rue, lemon verbina, epazota, turmeric (yellow and white), Jerusalem artichoke (accidentally), horseradish, sage, marjoram, oregano and papyrus reeds.

The papyrus is doing very nicely, about 7 feet tall and spreading fast - it burst it's original planter. I thought it would need more water than it does, but it's quite tolerant.
[link|http://www.aaxnet.com|AAx]
New Limes would be nice.
We've got an apricot tree and a nectarine tree in the backyard, but the squirrels and the wasps are the only ones who benefit from it.
Regards,

-scott anderson

"Welcome to Rivendell, Mr. Anderson..."
New Kaffir limes are a bit different.
The leaves are a little strange, two leaves per leaf stem and small warty fruit (often much more warty than the one in the picture). The fruits are highly aromatic but a bit dry so not good for squeezing.

Kaffir lime is an essential ingredient in Thai cooking with no satisfactory substitute. It's rather inconveneient to get though, if you don't have your own tree. The leaves are used in endless dishes while the fruit rinds are used in curry pastes. Ya just can't do Thai without 'em.

[image|http://www.clovegarden.com/ingred/img/ci_kafir03d.jpg||||]
[link|http://www.aaxnet.com|AAx]
New Why no kitchen waste in your compost?
I think I can understand no animal waste, but I thought vegetable waste would be good for it. My Dad's had a compost pile of some sort for many many years. I know we put vegetable waste in it, but I don't remember whether we put animal waste in.

Wade.


Is it enough to love
Is it enough to breathe
Somebody rip my heart out
And leave me here to bleed
 
Is it enough to die
Somebody save my life
I'd rather be Anything but Ordinary
Please



-- "Anything but Ordinary" by Avril Lavigne.

· my ·
· [link|http://staticsan.livejournal.com/|blog] ·
· [link|http://yceran.org/|website] ·

New Well, it comes down to two things . . .
First, there's no sorting in the kitchen - there's just one container, so it all goes into the pit, usually in the dead of night because - well, because that's when it gets done.

Second, the chip pile isn't particularly well managed, it just piles up in front of the chipper as stuff gets chipped. It'd take a lot more discipline and attention to run a proper compost system. It takes a real gardening enthusiast to do those things right.

The pigeon poop needs better handling too - and the fireplace ashes of which there are plenty because that's where I dispose of a lot of the debris from the blue gums. You can't use those leaves for mulch or compost because they're toxic.

Incidentally, bugs from Australia have finally made it to California. 20 years ago it was almost impossible to find a eucalyptus leaf with a bite out of it, now it's getting hard to find one that isn't bitten around the edges.

The long horned bark beetles have gotten here too, but they haven't caused the devestation predicted when they first appeared. In my experience they only go after newly cut logs, but boy do they munch on those!
[link|http://www.aaxnet.com|AAx]
New Blue gum leaves are toxic? How about sweet gum?
===

Kip Hawley is still an idiot.

===

Purveyor of Doc Hope's [link|http://DocHope.com|fresh-baked dog biscuits and pet treats].
[link|http://DocHope.com|http://DocHope.com]
New They are completely different - related only . . .
. . at the Class level (Magnoliopsida), and that's very distant indeed. Blue Gums are Eucalyptus, members of the Myrtle family. Sweet gum leaves are not toxic - eucalyptus is mildly toxic unless you are a Koala.
[link|http://www.aaxnet.com|AAx]
     Lika a moth to a candle - I just couldn't resist. - (Andrew Grygus) - (25)
         NSFL -- Not Safe For Lily (but then, I'm sure she knew that) -NT - (drewk) - (3)
             Hey, she might enjoy the (not shown) reverse side . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (2)
                 I'm only gonna say this once more. - (Lily) - (1)
                     Lab project yes - but . . . - (Andrew Grygus)
         waits in high anticipation /me loves head cheese -NT - (boxley) - (20)
             Actually, when this is done . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (18)
                 ROFL! there is a tribe of lost small boys around there -NT - (boxley) - (6)
                     Just *half* a tribe, apparently. -NT - (CRConrad) - (5)
                         I'm still betting on a dog . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (4)
                             How big are your crows out there? - (Another Scott) - (3)
                                 We don't have crows here - we have ravens . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (2)
                                     Decent book about ravens... . - (dmcarls) - (1)
                                         odd, ravens in the north are friendly to predators - (boxley)
                 You have a compost *pit* ... wow -NT - (drewk) - (10)
                     Yes, I dig a new one when one fills up . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (9)
                         What do you do with the compost? - (Lily) - (8)
                             Well, knowing Andrew... - (admin)
                             I don't have to do anything with it. - (Andrew Grygus) - (6)
                                 Limes would be nice. - (admin) - (1)
                                     Kaffir limes are a bit different. - (Andrew Grygus)
                                 Why no kitchen waste in your compost? - (static) - (3)
                                     Well, it comes down to two things . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (2)
                                         Blue gum leaves are toxic? How about sweet gum? -NT - (drewk) - (1)
                                             They are completely different - related only . . . - (Andrew Grygus)
             Here it is - the Big Cheese! Yay! - (Andrew Grygus)

One, two, three, four.
104 ms