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New MacOS “Mojave”
I must say that I like the new “dark mode” featured in this preview, but the indications are that 32-bit apps will break under the new regime. I have been to this dance several times since 1984, and do not propose to have my toes trampled upon once more. For one thing, a couple of applications in Mudbrick Technology’s “Fetid Fog” suite (longtime readers will recall that I am blessed with an untethered version of the 2014 iteration, which would otherwise cost me US $600 per annum) are still 32-bit. Accordingly, and even though Big Cheese could run this year’s model OS, I’ll be sticking with “High Sierra,” which has already broken a few apps.

Of course, if I’m determined to play with Mojave, I can simply clone my existing system to an external SSD (I am accumulating an abundance of these) or even one of my two surplus internal SSDs, install the upgrade and boot from that.

There was a period in the mid-nineties, when Apple appeared to be circling the drain, that caused me some anxiety: my livelihood depended on the product, and if the platform died, the best I could hope for at Flatline, Comatose, Torpor & Drowse would be a trip back to the International Division across some badly scorched bridges, and with a significant loss of seniority. Of course, the Blessed Saint Jobs returned from (speaking of deserts) penance and exile, and put things right, and even though after the merger, when FCT&D morphed into BrainDead Systems, I was obliged to purchase my own hardware and software, I at least came to work each day with some confidence that Cupertino had my back.

Had I, today, the prospect of fifteen or twenty more years relying on the Mac to pay the rent, I’d be a little worried, because the platform appears increasingly to be regarded by its creator as something like the red-headed stepchild of a rented mule. Fortunately, I am an annuitant on a fixed income which does not, however, involve me in any dependence upon the whims and megrims (to steal a line from Nabokov) of Silicon Valley. Sentimentally, though, I wish that the Mac might return to, or at least its engineering/management teams strive for, its former glory. At the moment, Mojave aside, the division appears all-but moribund.

cordially,
New Yes and no.
As long as people need a Mac for (at least essential parts of) iOS development, then Apple will keep selling Macs. Get really worried when Apple removes that requirement as the iPhone is their money press.

Being able to run the latest (or nearly the latest) macOS on 5+ year old hardware is a blessing and a curse. It's great when things are "fast enough" on old hardware, but when there are required processor functions that aren't available, etc., then it sucks to have to move to newer machines. And when you have to do that, it sucks to have to pay a premium for a 2+ year old design/CPU/RAM/storage interface.

It does seem that Apple is going to keep pushing the all-in-one iMac form factor. And it does make some sense - desktop PCs need a display, and by combining them with the processor/storage and using fairly high-quality screens, they can keep the price and their profit margins up. And make is more necessary for business customers to buy higher-end versions from the factory (we had to seal it all up on assembly because it was required by our elegant design!). And they can make faster, newer, UltaMegaBolt interfaces that let people attach fancy graphics cards, external storage, and all the rest, if they want to chase after such thing. And charge a fortune for them.

Apple went stupid with several designs in Jobs' day - The Cube is a notorious example. They do that. I expect them to keep making desktops for a long while, but not necessarily easily upgrade-able things like the Cheese Grater chassis. I don't expect an upgrade to the Mini (though I've got one and I think it's a great design) because they want to keep chasing the high end and there are too many cheap PCs that are that size.

You've got enough experience that a Hackintosh might be a worthwhile route for you when the time comes. Don't stay wedded too long to the old apps and OS - it's too easy to be left behind.

(One of my first job interviews after grad school was for a technical writer position. They wanted someone with Word Perfect 5.0 experience. I had 4.2. I got the job, but had to explain that they were basically the same.)

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
New issue with the imac footprint
loved the design, but people with meetings need a lapper, now a $ms lapper is a much better bang for buck you still need to xfr files so the laptop market for mac should be fairly large if not equal to an imac. The price differential for what is very similar hardware is too large. I dont mind paying a premium but if the premium is 4X#ms I am buying $ms

Caveat,
I do unix stuff not high end visual stuff. In that case the price differential may be worth it.
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of the experts" – Richard Feynman
New Zooks!++
As long as people need a Mac for (at least essential parts of) iOS development, then Apple will keep selling Macs. Get really worried when Apple removes that requirement as the iPhone is their money press.

Being able to run the latest (or nearly the latest) macOS on 5+ year old hardware is a blessing and a curse. It's great when things are "fast enough" on old hardware, but when there are required processor functions that aren't available, etc., then it sucks to have to move to newer machines. And when you have to do that, it sucks to have to pay a premium for a 2+ year old design/CPU/RAM/storage interface.

It does seem that Apple is going to keep pushing the all-in-one iMac form factor. And it does make some sense - desktop PCs need a display, and by combining them with the processor/storage and using fairly high-quality screens, they can keep the price and their profit margins up. And make is more necessary for business customers to buy higher-end versions from the factory (we had to seal it all up on assembly because it was required by our elegant design!). And they can make faster, newer, UltaMegaBolt interfaces that let people attach fancy graphics cards, external storage, and all the rest, if they want to chase after such thing. And charge a fortune for them.

Apple went stupid with several designs in Jobs' day - The Cube is a notorious example. They do that. I expect them to keep making desktops for a long while, but not necessarily easily upgrade-able things like the Cheese Grater chassis. I don't expect an upgrade to the Mini (though I've got one and I think it's a great design) because they want to keep chasing the high end and there are too many cheap PCs that are that size.

You've got enough experience that a Hackintosh might be a worthwhile route for you when the time comes. Don't stay wedded too long to the old apps and OS - it's too easy to be left behind.

(One of my first job interviews after grad school was for a technical writer position. They wanted someone with Word Perfect 5.0 experience. I had 4.2. I got the job, but had to explain that they were basically the same.)

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
Expand Edited by Another Scott June 16, 2018, 11:39:29 PM EDT
New Zooks!++
As long as people need a Mac for (at least essential parts of) iOS development, then Apple will keep selling Macs. Get really worried when Apple removes that requirement as the iPhone is their money press.

Being able to run the latest (or nearly the latest) macOS on 5+ year old hardware is a blessing and a curse. It's great when things are "fast enough" on old hardware, but when there are required processor functions that aren't available, etc., then it sucks to have to move to newer machines. And when you have to do that, it sucks to have to pay a premium for a 2+ year old design/CPU/RAM/storage interface.

It does seem that Apple is going to keep pushing the all-in-one iMac form factor. And it does make some sense - desktop PCs need a display, and by combining them with the processor/storage and using fairly high-quality screens, they can keep the price and their profit margins up. And make is more necessary for business customers to buy higher-end versions from the factory (we had to seal it all up on assembly because it was required by our elegant design!). And they can make faster, newer, UltaMegaBolt interfaces that let people attach fancy graphics cards, external storage, and all the rest, if they want to chase after such thing. And charge a fortune for them.

Apple went stupid with several designs in Jobs' day - The Cube is a notorious example. They do that. I expect them to keep making desktops for a long while, but not necessarily easily upgrade-able things like the Cheese Grater chassis. I don't expect an upgrade to the Mini (though I've got one and I think it's a great design) because they want to keep chasing the high end and there are too many cheap PCs that are that size.

You've got enough experience that a Hackintosh might be a worthwhile route for you when the time comes. Don't stay wedded too long to the old apps and OS - it's too easy to be left behind.

(One of my first job interviews after grad school was for a technical writer position. They wanted someone with Word Perfect 5.0 experience. I had 4.2. I got the job, but had to explain that they were basically the same.)

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
Expand Edited by Another Scott June 16, 2018, 11:39:08 PM EDT
New Zooks!++
As long as people need a Mac for (at least essential parts of) iOS development, then Apple will keep selling Macs. Get really worried when Apple removes that requirement as the iPhone is their money press.

Being able to run the latest (or nearly the latest) macOS on 5+ year old hardware is a blessing and a curse. It's great when things are "fast enough" on old hardware, but when there are required processor functions that aren't available, etc., then it sucks to have to move to newer machines. And when you have to do that, it sucks to have to pay a premium for a 2+ year old design/CPU/RAM/storage interface.

It does seem that Apple is going to keep pushing the all-in-one iMac form factor. And it does make some sense - desktop PCs need a display, and by combining them with the processor/storage and using fairly high-quality screens, they can keep the price and their profit margins up. And make is more necessary for business customers to buy higher-end versions from the factory (we had to seal it all up on assembly because it was required by our elegant design!). And they can make faster, newer, UltaMegaBolt interfaces that let people attach fancy graphics cards, external storage, and all the rest, if they want to chase after such thing. And charge a fortune for them.

Apple went stupid with several designs in Jobs' day - The Cube is a notorious example. They do that. I expect them to keep making desktops for a long while, but not necessarily easily upgrade-able things like the Cheese Grater chassis. I don't expect an upgrade to the Mini (though I've got one and I think it's a great design) because they want to keep chasing the high end and there are too many cheap PCs that are that size.

You've got enough experience that a Hackintosh might be a worthwhile route for you when the time comes. Don't stay wedded too long to the old apps and OS - it's too easy to be left behind.

(One of my first job interviews after grad school was for a technical writer position. They wanted someone with Word Perfect 5.0 experience. I had 4.2. I got the job, but had to explain that they were basically the same.)

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
Expand Edited by Another Scott June 16, 2018, 11:39:49 PM EDT
New Zooks!++
As long as people need a Mac for (at least essential parts of) iOS development, then Apple will keep selling Macs. Get really worried when Apple removes that requirement as the iPhone is their money press.

Being able to run the latest (or nearly the latest) macOS on 5+ year old hardware is a blessing and a curse. It's great when things are "fast enough" on old hardware, but when there are required processor functions that aren't available, etc., then it sucks to have to move to newer machines. And when you have to do that, it sucks to have to pay a premium for a 2+ year old design/CPU/RAM/storage interface.

It does seem that Apple is going to keep pushing the all-in-one iMac form factor. And it does make some sense - desktop PCs need a display, and by combining them with the processor/storage and using fairly high-quality screens, they can keep the price and their profit margins up. And make is more necessary for business customers to buy higher-end versions from the factory (we had to seal it all up on assembly because it was required by our elegant design!). And they can make faster, newer, UltaMegaBolt interfaces that let people attach fancy graphics cards, external storage, and all the rest, if they want to chase after such thing. And charge a fortune for them.

Apple went stupid with several designs in Jobs' day - The Cube is a notorious example. They do that. I expect them to keep making desktops for a long while, but not necessarily easily upgrade-able things like the Cheese Grater chassis. I don't expect an upgrade to the Mini (though I've got one and I think it's a great design) because they want to keep chasing the high end and there are too many cheap PCs that are that size.

You've got enough experience that a Hackintosh might be a worthwhile route for you when the time comes. Don't stay wedded too long to the old apps and OS - it's too easy to be left behind.

(One of my first job interviews after grad school was for a technical writer position. They wanted someone with Word Perfect 5.0 experience. I had 4.2. I got the job, but had to explain that they were basically the same.)

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
Expand Edited by Another Scott June 16, 2018, 11:38:46 PM EDT
New Zooks!++
As long as people need a Mac for (at least essential parts of) iOS development, then Apple will keep selling Macs. Get really worried when Apple removes that requirement as the iPhone is their money press.

Being able to run the latest (or nearly the latest) macOS on 5+ year old hardware is a blessing and a curse. It's great when things are "fast enough" on old hardware, but when there are required processor functions that aren't available, etc., then it sucks to have to move to newer machines. And when you have to do that, it sucks to have to pay a premium for a 2+ year old design/CPU/RAM/storage interface.

It does seem that Apple is going to keep pushing the all-in-one iMac form factor. And it does make some sense - desktop PCs need a display, and by combining them with the processor/storage and using fairly high-quality screens, they can keep the price and their profit margins up. And make is more necessary for business customers to buy higher-end versions from the factory (we had to seal it all up on assembly because it was required by our elegant design!). And they can make faster, newer, UltaMegaBolt interfaces that let people attach fancy graphics cards, external storage, and all the rest, if they want to chase after such thing. And charge a fortune for them.

Apple went stupid with several designs in Jobs' day - The Cube is a notorious example. They do that. I expect them to keep making desktops for a long while, but not necessarily easily upgrade-able things like the Cheese Grater chassis. I don't expect an upgrade to the Mini (though I've got one and I think it's a great design) because they want to keep chasing the high end and there are too many cheap PCs that are that size.

You've got enough experience that a Hackintosh might be a worthwhile route for you when the time comes. Don't stay wedded too long to the old apps and OS - it's too easy to be left behind.

(One of my first job interviews after grad school was for a technical writer position. They wanted someone with Word Perfect 5.0 experience. I had 4.2. I got the job, but had to explain that they were basically the same.)

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
Expand Edited by Another Scott June 16, 2018, 11:37:54 PM EDT
New Zooks!++
As long as people need a Mac for (at least essential parts of) iOS development, then Apple will keep selling Macs. Get really worried when Apple removes that requirement as the iPhone is their money press.

Being able to run the latest (or nearly the latest) macOS on 5+ year old hardware is a blessing and a curse. It's great when things are "fast enough" on old hardware, but when there are required processor functions that aren't available, etc., then it sucks to have to move to newer machines. And when you have to do that, it sucks to have to pay a premium for a 2+ year old design/CPU/RAM/storage interface.

It does seem that Apple is going to keep pushing the all-in-one iMac form factor. And it does make some sense - desktop PCs need a display, and by combining them with the processor/storage and using fairly high-quality screens, they can keep the price and their profit margins up. And make is more necessary for business customers to buy higher-end versions from the factory (we had to seal it all up on assembly because it was required by our elegant design!). And they can make faster, newer, UltaMegaBolt interfaces that let people attach fancy graphics cards, external storage, and all the rest, if they want to chase after such thing. And charge a fortune for them.

Apple went stupid with several designs in Jobs' day - The Cube is a notorious example. They do that. I expect them to keep making desktops for a long while, but not necessarily easily upgrade-able things like the Cheese Grater chassis. I don't expect an upgrade to the Mini (though I've got one and I think it's a great design) because they want to keep chasing the high end and there are too many cheap PCs that are that size.

You've got enough experience that a Hackintosh might be a worthwhile route for you when the time comes. Don't stay wedded too long to the old apps and OS - it's too easy to be left behind.

(One of my first job interviews after grad school was for a technical writer position. They wanted someone with Word Perfect 5.0 experience. I had 4.2. I got the job, but had to explain that they were basically the same.)

Good luck!

Cheers,
Scott.
Expand Edited by Another Scott June 16, 2018, 11:38:24 PM EDT
New Ah…we got it the first time. But thanks.
New (I clicked the post button 1x, but it showed up 7 times. Weird.)
New Was that on a Windows machine? :)
Alex

"There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."

-- Isaac Asimov
     MacOS “Mojave” - (rcareaga) - (11)
         Yes and no. - (Another Scott) - (1)
             issue with the imac footprint - (boxley)
         Zooks!++ - (Another Scott)
         Zooks!++ - (Another Scott)
         Zooks!++ - (Another Scott)
         Zooks!++ - (Another Scott) - (3)
         Zooks!++ - (Another Scott) - (3)
         Zooks!++ - (Another Scott) - (3)
             Ah…we got it the first time. But thanks. -NT - (rcareaga) - (2)
                 (I clicked the post button 1x, but it showed up 7 times. Weird.) -NT - (Another Scott) - (1)
                     Was that on a Windows machine? :) -NT - (a6l6e6x)

It's watching you from across the way...
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