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New Meh. It's annoying, too.
I've got Aero turned off on Win7 and it does that "full screen when the window touches the top of the screen" stuff. Like AG, I don't like it. I have to double-click the window top to get it back to the size I had it. (I guess MS thinks that desktop users have to learn yet another manipulation technique to do something that's been available since Win3 (if not earlier) so that they can tabletize the desktop.)

Double-clicking the windows top to maximize/restore to previous size is much faster than dragging it around.

But thanks for the explanation. I've "discovered" the drag-maximize thingy but didn't appreciate the others. :-)

Cheers,
Scott.
New "Aero Snap" =/= "Aero", I think.
I'm actually on balance with PeeWee on this. Yes, it's annoying sometimes, but helpful slightly more often. Two things, though:

1) I've got "Aero" off too, I think (that *is* the silly transparent-windows Fisher-Price II interface from Vista, innit?), and the snappy-thingy behaviour still present in my "Windows Classic" theme. But following the instructions on the page Peter linked, I was able to turn it off. I'm guessing the snappy-thingy, "Aero Snap", can be turned off even if one has the ugly stupid "Aero" visible theme enabled (not that I'm even going to try enabling the latter). TL;DR: Aero Snap is not Aero; it needs to be separately disabled as per the linked page.

2) Another quick tip that might help: Contrary to Peter's perhaps overly-terse summary, I found that (at least on my StinkPad) Win-down first restores a maximized window to its previous size, and only then minimizes it on the next press. Likewise, Win-Left or Win-Right don't just snap the window to the respective edge, but on successive keypresses they cycle through the range of Windowed-center, snap-to-edge, other-edge, center... Left- or rightwards depending on which arrow key you use. (This thing is actually looking better and better -- Thanks, PeeWee!) The Win-Up/Down key combo doesn't cycle that way, though; there, you have to alternate Up- and Down-arrow.

HTH!
--
Christian R. Conrad
Same old username (as above), but now on iki.fi

(Yeah, yeah, it redirects to the same old GMail... But just in case I ever want to change.)
New Thanks. Progress is good, but muscle memory is stubborn.
New Turning Aero off makes your computer go slower.
The compositing hardware-accelerated window manager has its wings clipped when running in "classic" mode. When Aero is enabled, the DWM can offload some work onto the GPU.

Desktop users probably won't care, but laptop users may see their battery life affected as CPU use is elevated slightly.

Note: you can't turn Aero off in Windows 8. Not that you'd want to, because it's better than what went before, and is considerably less blingy. In Windows 7 (i.e. on my work laptop), I have set the window colour to "slate" and turned transparency off, and that makes a lot of the visual silliness go away.
Expand Edited by pwhysall Sept. 14, 2013, 12:45:26 PM EDT
New DWM = Aero? Didn't seem so from the 7forum site you link to.
A few clicks on "related" starting from the page you gave us, there was something about how to enable DWM while not the Aero interface. OK, so maybe you meant that DWM = Aero, and Aero =/= Aero interface... Shit gets too confusing with MS naming conventions.
--
Christian R. Conrad
Same old username (as above), but now on iki.fi

(Yeah, yeah, it redirects to the same old GMail... But just in case I ever want to change.)
New Really?
Does it depend on the video chipset? My laptops don't have any fancy graphics chips. The Toshiba R835 (IIRC) has an Intel HD3000.

Hmmm...

http://www.intel.com.../sb/cs-023607.htm

Verify that your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements for Windows Aero.
Microsoft's system requirements for Windows Aero include:

1 GHz 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit processor
1 GB of system memory
Graphics controller with 128 MB graphics memory, WDDM driver, and supports Pixel Shader 2.0 in hardware and 32 bits per pixel color.


Apparently the HD3000 can do that (of course it is a shared memory chipset (64 MB dedicated) so...).

Hmm... I see MS ripped out the GDI hardware acceleration with Vista and later. Figures.

Maybe I don't actually have Aero turned off. I simply did:

Control Panel -> Performance Information and Tools -> Adjust Visual Effects -> Adjust for Best Performance (everything unchecked). (The Performance Information summary shows "Desktop Performance for Windows Aero = 5.9"

Under Personalization, I'm running a slight variation of the Windows Classic theme.

So, I guess Aero is running.

As CRC said, Windows naming conventions for this stuff is confusing... :-/

FWIW.

Thanks for the info!

Cheers,
Scott.
     new lapper, winders 8 - (boxley) - (13)
         Multitouch. - (Another Scott) - (11)
             sounds like an external mouse fix -NT - (boxley)
             What he describes . . . - (Andrew Grygus) - (9)
                 That too. :-/ -NT - (Another Scott)
                 Aero Snap is brilliant - (pwhysall) - (7)
                     Meh. It's annoying, too. - (Another Scott) - (5)
                         "Aero Snap" =/= "Aero", I think. - (CRConrad) - (1)
                             Thanks. Progress is good, but muscle memory is stubborn. -NT - (Another Scott)
                         Turning Aero off makes your computer go slower. - (pwhysall) - (2)
                             DWM = Aero? Didn't seem so from the 7forum site you link to. - (CRConrad)
                             Really? - (Another Scott)
                     Re: Aero Snap is brilliant - (boxley)
         Same thing as spinning the scroll wheel on the mouse... - (CRConrad)

5 out of 7, perfect.
68 ms