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New O'Reilly ONLamp article on Smalltalk.
[link|http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2006/09/21/learning_smalltalk.html|O'Reilly OnLamp]:

Smalltalk for Everyone Else
by Keith Fieldhouse
09/21/2006

You've decided to expand your horizons. You've been programming exclusively in Java (or C++, or Perl, or Ruby) for a while now. You're happy and productive, but you have this nagging feeling that you're solving problems by rote rather than thinking as creatively as you once did. Learning a new language, especially one that forces you to re-examine some of your notions about software development, may be just the ticket.

Smalltalk, an influential language with deep roots in software development practice, offers an outstanding opportunity for stretching your mind and exercising your development muscles. The only drawback is that once you try it, you may never go back. This article will help you get started.


via [link|http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006092400426OSHLDV|LinuxToday].

[edit:] Typos. Turning Japanese, I think I'm turning Japanese ...

Cheers,
Scott.
Collapse Edited by Another Scott Sept. 26, 2006, 07:53:10 AM EDT
O'Reilly ONRamp article on Smalltalk.
[link|http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2006/09/21/learning_smalltalk.html|O'Reilly OnRamp]:

Smalltalk for Everyone Else
by Keith Fieldhouse
09/21/2006

You've decided to expand your horizons. You've been programming exclusively in Java (or C++, or Perl, or Ruby) for a while now. You're happy and productive, but you have this nagging feeling that you're solving problems by rote rather than thinking as creatively as you once did. Learning a new language, especially one that forces you to re-examine some of your notions about software development, may be just the ticket.

Smalltalk, an influential language with deep roots in software development practice, offers an outstanding opportunity for stretching your mind and exercising your development muscles. The only drawback is that once you try it, you may never go back. This article will help you get started.


via [link|http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2006092400426OSHLDV|LinuxToday].

Cheers,
Scott.
New From what I am seeing
Smalltalk is definitely on the rise. More and more newbies are showing up on the mailing lists and there are a lot of interesting projects coming out.




[link|http://www.blackbagops.net|Black Bag Operations Log]

[link|http://www.objectiveclips.com|Artificial Intelligence]

[link|http://www.badpage.info/seaside/html|Scrutinizer]
New En passant, stumbled across
(don't ask me how)

[link|http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000519.html|Choosing between .NET Pepsi and .NET Coke]

I was looking for 'p-code', for arcane reasons.. noticed
It's too bad the .NET CLR can't support something as powerful as Smalltalk or Perl without resorting to tricks that destroy interoperability. That's the reason the Parrot project was started, and is coming along quite nicely. Once Parrot is done, you'll be able to intercall between Perl, Python, TCL, C#, Java, and almost anything else.
Randal L. Schwartz on February 18, 2006 11:16 AM



YPB - talk about yer Language-murder; M$-HappyTalk seems to be an unstoppable flood of new gobbledy-jargon. Can Nothing shut them up?

     O'Reilly ONLamp article on Smalltalk. - (Another Scott) - (2)
         From what I am seeing - (tuberculosis)
         En passant, stumbled across - (Ashton)

Inside, they're not answering.
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